Access to Historical Records Webinars Announced

I would like to bring to your attention three upcoming webinars regarding NHPRC’s Access to Historical Records grant program. The webinar schedule and instructions appear at the end of the message.

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission invites applications for this grant program to promote the preservation and use of historical records collections to broaden understanding of our democracy, history, and culture. The program emphasizes the creation of online tools that facilitate the public discovery of historical records.

The Commission looks to fund projects that undertake the following activities:

– Preservation, arrangement, and online description of historical records in all formats
– Digital preservation of electronic records and unstable audio and moving image formats

After completing arrangement and description activities, applicants may also digitize selected archival series from the processed materials to provide online access to collections. Applicants that intend solely to digitize materials will be asked to submit proposals to the Digital Dissemination of Archival Collections program.

Applicants must have an existing archival program in place. This grant program does not support archival start-up activities of any kind, including electronic records start-ups. For answers to some frequently asked questions, please visit this link.

A grant normally is for one or two years and for up to $200,000. The Commission expects to make up to 14 grants in this category for a total of up to $1,000,000. Grants begin no earlier than 1 January 2017.

Deadlines: DRAFT 4 April 2016; FINAL 15 June 2016.

Webinars will be held on the following dates and times:

Thursday, 11 February @ 3:30 p.m. Eastern

Wednesday, 17 February @ 3:30 p.m. Eastern

Monday, 22 February @ 2:00 p.m. Eastern

Webinar attendees will need to click on the following link (https://connect16.uc.att.com/gsa1/meet/?ExEventID=87508535) and enter their name and email address. You do not need to pre-register for these webinars. Please email me at alexander.lorch@nara.gov if you have any questions.

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Revised Strategic Plan Framework

Preface to the National Historical Publications and Records Commission Strategic Plan Framework

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission enhances public access to historical records collections nationwide. The Commission works with state and local governments, historical societies, colleges and universities, and other nonprofit institutions in leading these access efforts through a modest but catalytic grants program. Through its unique position of public outreach, the Commission provides the opportunity to connect the work of the National Archives with the work of the nation’s archives.

From its inception in 1934 as part of the National Archives, the National Historical Publications and Records Commission has focused on the preservation and use of historical records collections in the United States. The Commission has long played a leadership role in meeting the challenges of broadening access to these collections through preservation and access projects, research and development initiatives, and best practices and new methodologies.

Early years were spent spurring the initial development of historical documentary editions. Beginning in the 1960s, the Commission made access happen through its critical support for publishing historical records collections in print and microfilm. It advanced best practices and new methods through the development of the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents and more recently the Archives Leadership Institute. It proved instrumental in its early investments on electronic records research, encoded archival description, the “More Product/Less Process” protocols, the creation of state historical records advisory boards, the National Forum on Archival Continuing Education, and much more.

Leadership efforts remain a hallmark of the NHPRC.  With this in mind, at their November 2015 meeting the members of the National Historical Publications and Records Commission approved a draft framework for a new Strategic Plan. Through collaboration with the National Archives, other Federal agencies, and private funders, the Commission seeks to enhance its national leadership role, continue its support of our partners in the states, historical documentary editions, and professional development and training, and expands programs designed to enhance public participation in preserving and using historical records collections.

We invite public comment here on the revised framework by February 1, 2016.

~

 

NHPRC Strategic Plan Framework

 

Mission

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission provides opportunities for the American people to discover and use records that increase understanding of our democracy, history, and culture.

Vision

Through leadership initiatives, grants, and fostering the creation of new tools and methods, the National Historical Publications and Records Commission connects the work of the National Archives to the work of the nation’s archives. The Commission acts as a bridge for innovation and creativity in advancing best archival practices, publishing historical records, and connecting citizens to their records.

 

GOAL: Connect the National Archives with the work of the nation’s archives.

The Commission plays a key national leadership role in developing and promoting best practices, model programs, and partnerships among the nation’s vast network of archives and documentary editing projects.  The Commission will collaborate with other funders to create leadership initiatives designed to solve problems and meet challenges.

Objectives:

  • Build state partnerships around key needs, such as electronic records management
  • Support professional development opportunities for archivists and documentary editors
  • Fund research, development, and dissemination of best practices, tools, and methodologies

 

 

GOAL: Expand access to the nation’s historical records.

The Commission makes access happen through multiple ways: by preserving, arranging, describing, and publishing collections. Projects create online finding aids, digitized collections, and documentary editions in print and online versions. The Commission will collaborate with other funders to expand access to historical records.

 Objectives

  •  Complete current documentary editions (print and online) and identify new projects to make historical records collections more widely accessible
  • Broaden preservation of, and increased online access to, historical records collections
  • Promote open access to collections to encourage re-use and analysis
  • Support the development and use of standards for online publishing of historical records collections
  • Initiate collaborative projects for long-term sustainability of digital resources

 

GOAL: Engage the American people in preserving the American record.

Democracy requires an informed citizenry able to discover and use those records critical to understanding American democracy, history, and culture. Archivists and documentary editors are also encouraging people to acquire skills necessary to preserve and make accessible historical records. The Commission will collaborate with archives, repositories, and historical records publishing projects to engage more directly with people in their communities and online.

Objectives:

  • Encourage new methods for the public to share their knowledge about and interest in historical records, by volunteering, preserving their own records, and other means.
  • Promote educational/training efforts by archivists, editors, and records managers to foster public engagement
  • Support the development of open source tools to facilitate public participation in expanding access to historical records
  • Collaborate with state boards on local and statewide projects to encourage public participation and engagement in the work of archives

 

 

GOAL: Enhance the capacity of small and diverse organizations with historical records collections.

The Commission seeks to encourage small and diverse organizations with historical collections that represent the rich diversity of America’s culture and history and to assist small repositories with tools to raise their capacities.

Objectives:

  • Streamline the application and review processes
  • Encourage a wider pool of applicants
  • Increase emphasis on resource sustainability and preservation plans
  • Fund the creation of tools for smaller repositories and underserved communities
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NHPRC News September

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The September issue of the NHPRC News is up at http://www.archives.gov/nhprc/newsletter/2015/sept/ with info on our Strategic Plan, the application deadlines of October 8, and stories on Kentucky Civil War Governors, Arabella Chapman, Edison’s Talking Doll, and Owen Wister’s “The Virginian.”

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September 15 Deadline for Comments on Strategic Planning

We’re looking for your comments on our draft Strategic Plan Framework by September 15.

You can watch a presentation at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BV2ZVLupFJ0

and send in your comments via email or on our blog at http://blogs.archives.gov/…/national-historical-publicatio…/ or via email to nhprc@nara.gov

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National Historical Publications and Records Commission Strategic Planning

Help Build Our New Strategic Plan

 

A full presentation of this plan is available on YouTube at https://youtu.be/BV2ZVLupFJ0 that will provide some background and context for the work of the NHPRC and how we drafted this Preliminary Strategic Planning Goals Framework, and we encourage you to review it.

We welcome your comments here or at one of our Webinars scheduled for July 28 and August 12. See information below on how to participate.

 

Preliminary Strategic Planning Goals Framework

As we begin our Strategic Planning process, the Commission has met and discussed its enduring strengths, ongoing mission, current programming, and broad needs for the preservation and use of historical records. Out of this initial discussion, the staff has put together a preliminary overview of some future goals and directions for the Commission. Some of these ideas would require additional resources, including funding partnerships.

 

Expand access to the nation’s historical records.

The primary role of the Commission is to provide opportunities for the American people to discover and use records that increase understanding of our democracy, history, and culture. To that end, the National Archives funds projects that publish collections of historical records—including documentary editions in print and online versions and digital editions online. Several challenges have arisen during this transitional period, and the Commission will use its regular programming and seek new funding to:

  • Support multiple levels of access leading to online access and to open access
  • Promote the development and use of standards for online publishing of collections
  • Identify historically significant collections in need of a national initiative for full online access
  • Partner with and support collaborative and collective projects for long-term sustainability of digital resources

 

Engage the American people in preserving the American record.

A key challenge ahead is to help grantees engage directly with people in their communities and online. Along with efforts for greater public engagement, archives are encouraging people to learn critical thinking skills and basic research techniques when seeking and using historical records in both analog and digital formats. The National Archives has enlisted Citizen Archivists in crowdsourcing, and the Commission will seek to broaden that practice and to:

  • Encourage new organizational methods for crowdsourcing for historical records
  • Promote educational/training efforts for Citizen Archivists at other archives
  • Collaborate with state boards on local & statewide grassroots projects

 

 Provide leadership through the National Archives.

The National Archives plays a key national leadership role in developing and promoting best practices, model programs, and partnerships among the nation’s vast network of archives and documentary editing projects.  Through the Commission, the National Archives seeks to:

  • Build state partnerships around key needs, such as electronic records management
  • Continue to support professional development opportunities for archivists and documentary editors
  • Fund research, development, & dissemination of best practices
  • Collaborate with other funders on initiatives and programs

 

Adapt Commission practices to extend its reach and leverage.

The Commission seeks to encourage a more inclusive pool of applicants that represents the rich diversity of America’s culture and history. To that end, it will seek ways to demonstrate the public impact of its programming and to improve its internal management processes to:

  •  Streamline its application and review processes
  • Clarify language re “national significance” to encourage a wider pool of applicants
  • Strengthen the connection of its grants program to the imprimatur of the National Archives

 

NHPRC Webinars on Strategic Planning – 7/28 and 8/12

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission is drafting a new Strategic Plan and wants your input. A youtube presentation on the draft plan is available at https://youtu.be/BV2ZVLupFJ0.

The webinar will revolve around discussions of four preliminary goals for a new Strategic Plan:

  • Expand access to the nation’s historical records.
  • Engage the American people in preserving the American record.
  • Provide leadership through the National Archives.
  • Adapt Commission practices to extend its reach and leverage.

 

Join the NHPRC for a discussion of its Strategic Plan at webinars on

Tuesday, July 28, 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm Eastern

Wednesday, August 12, 3 pm-4 pm Eastern

 

Connect to the webinar: https://www.connectmeeting.att.com

 

Enter the Meeting Number: 888-331-6674

Enter the Access Code: 9763969

Enter your Email Address

Enter your Name:

 

You will have  the option for the Connect Meeting App to call you to connect you to the webinar.  You have to enter your phone number. This is the best choice!

If that does not work, you will call 888-331-6674 and enter 9763969 to listen on your phone.

You can also listen on your speaker and type questions.

If you can’t make one of the webinars, you can always contact Communications Director Keith Donohue, keith.donohue @nara.gov, 202-357-5365 for more information.

 

 

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Recording and Slides from Literacy and Engagement with Historical Records Webinar

The July 10 webinar on the Literacy and Engagement with Historical Records Grant Program was recorded. Watch and listen here:
https://connect16.uc.att.com/gsa1/meet/?RecordingKey=5210BCD0-24CC-48BF-BDAD-B3F853C168F6

If you just want the slides, here they are as a PDF: WebinarsL&E2015

But there is still another live webinar on the grant program on

Thursday, July 16, 4 pm-5 pm Eastern

Connect to the webinar:

https://www.connectmeeting.att.com

Enter the Meeting Number: 888-331-6674

Enter the Access Code: 6503625

Enter your Email Address

Enter your Name:

You will have the option for the Connect Meeting App to call you to connect you to the webinar. You have to enter your phone number. This is the best choice!

If that does not work, you will call 888-331-6674 and enter 6503625 to listen on your phone.

You can also listen on your speaker and type questions.

If you can’t make this webinar or just have more questions, please contact the program officer: Lucy Barber, lucy.barber@nara.gov, 202-357-5306 for more information.

 

 

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Webinars on Literacy & Engagement with Historical Records

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NHPRC Webinars on Literacy and Engagement with Historical Records – 7/10 and 7/16

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission is offering for the second time grants to support Literacy and Engagement with Historical Records. The announcement is
available here: http://www.archives.gov/nhprc/announcement/literacy.html

Are you interested in organizing projects that will enhance the ability of people (students, seniors, the public) to understand and use historical records? Have you tested ideas but want to try them on a larger audience? Do you have digital resources but want to engage people with them by using crowdsourcing and other methods of engagement and discussion?

Join the NHPRC for an overview of its grant program Literacy and Engagement with Historical Records at webinars on

Friday, July 10, 3 pm – 4 pm Eastern

Thursday, July 16, 4 pm-5 pm Eastern

Connect to the webinar:

https://www.connectmeeting.att.com

Enter the Meeting Number: 888-331-6674
Enter the Access Code: 6503625
Enter your Email Address
Enter your Name:
You will have the option for the Connect Meeting App to call you to connect you to the webinar. You have to enter your phone number. This is the best choice!

If that does not work, you will call 888-331-6674 and enter 6503625 to listen on your phone.

You can also listen on your speaker and type questions.

If you can’t make one of the webinars, you can always contact the program officer: Lucy Barber, lucy.barber@nara.gov, 202-357-5306 for more information.

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Webinars for State Government Electronic Records

Update: Thanks to all who attended these webinars. For those who requested copies of the slides, and for those who could not attend but would like to see the slides used during the webinar, they are available here: SGER2015

 

NHPRC will be hosting two webinars to answer questions of those interested in the State Government Electronic Records grant program. The webinar schedule and instructions appear at the end of the message.

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission seeks projects that will accession, describe, preserve, and provide access to state government electronic records of enduring value. Government information maintained by state archives is a national asset, serving as important resources for documenting rights and capturing the national experience. The NHPRC will support projects that actively engage in activities that preserve electronic record assets and make them available for public discovery.

The Commission encourages collaborative projects that bring together multiple parties to plan for and carry out project goals and outcomes. The NHPRC strongly encourages applicants to leverage the resources resulting from the Council of State Archivists’ State Electronic Records Initiative (SERI) to inform their work.

Projects in this program cannot digitize historical records. If you intend to digitize as part of archival processing of materials, refer to the Access to Historical Records grant announcement. If you already have description information in place and want to create digital surrogates, refer to the Digital Dissemination of Archival Collections grant announcement. In addition, projects cannot establish electronic document management systems that only manage born-digital records with limited retention periods.

Applications requesting support for these activities will be considered ineligible in this program.

A grant normally is for one to three years and up to $200,000. The Commission expects to make 3 or more grants in this category, for a total of up to $600,000. Grants begin no earlier than July 1, 2016.

Deadlines:

DRAFT 3 August 2015

FINAL 8 October 2015.

 

Webinars will be held:

Friday, 26 June @ 3:00 p.m. Eastern

Wednesday, 1 July @ 4:00 p.m. Eastern

Webinar attendees will need to click on the following link

(https://connect16.uc.att.com/gsa1/meet/?ExEventID=86764535) and enter their name and email address. You do not need to pre-register for these webinars.

Please email me at nancy.melley@nara.gov if you have any questions.

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Webinars for Digital Dissemination of Archival Collections

Update: Thanks to all who attended these webinars. For those who requested copies of the slides, and for those who could not attend but would like to see the slides used during the webinar, they are available here: DDACJune2015

 

NHPRC will be hosting two webinars to answer questions of those interested in the Digital Dissemination of Archival Collections grant program. The webinar schedule and instructions appear at the end of the message.

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission desires to make historical records of national significance to the United States broadly available by disseminating digital surrogates on the Internet.

Projects may focus on the papers of major figures from American life or cover broad historical movements in politics, military, business, social reform, the arts, and other aspects of the national experience. The historical value of the records and their expected usefulness to broad audiences must justify the costs of the project. The Commission will not consider proposals that charge for access.

Grants are awarded for digitizing documentary source materials. Applications that do not include digitization of analog archival records will be considered ineligible. If you are working with born-digital records, please review the Access to Historical Records or the State Government Electronic Records announcements.

Applicants may digitize a single collection or set of collections for online dissemination. Such online publications should provide basic access to collections. Collaborations among repositories are encouraged.

In addition, applicants may undertake more complex descriptive work, such as document transcription, tagging, or geo-referencing, if these additional access points are justified by the value of the material and its expected users.

For frequently asked questions, please visit this link: http://www.archives.gov/nhprc/announcement/digital-faqs.html

Applicants may apply for funding for one to two years. Award amounts can range from $20,000 to $150,000. The Commission expects to make as many as 7 grants in this category, for a total of up to $500,000. Grants begin no earlier than July 1, 2016.

Deadlines:

DRAFT 3 August 2015

FINAL 8 October 2015.

 

Webinars will be held:

Wednesday, 24 June @ 3:00 p.m. Eastern

Tuesday, 30 June @ 4:00 p.m. Eastern

Webinar attendees will need to click on the following link

(https://connect16.uc.att.com/gsa1/meet/?ExEventID=86764535) and enter their name and email address. You do not need to pre-register for these webinars.

Please email me at nancy.melley@nara.gov if you have any questions.

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Helping Smaller Archival Repositories Preserve Their Collections and Make Them Accessible

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As I mentioned in a previous blog, the NHPRC is celebrating the 40th anniversary of the State Historical Records Advisory Boards (SHRABs) in 2015. The SHRABs in many of the states have received funding for regrant programs that permit them to make small grants of their own. These regrant funds are often awarded to smaller historical societies, museums, libraries, and colleges for projects that would not necessarily be competitive at the Federal level. Through state regrant programs, many hundreds of institutions have benefited from approximately $7,000,000 in funding.

For many records repositories, adequate funding is not available for something as basic as purchasing all of the archival supplies that are needed in order to adequately preserve their collections. Regrant funds have helped to address this need. For example, recent regrant awards made by the Oklahoma Board are allowing the Will Rogers Memorial Museum and the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum to purchase archival supplies for rehousing collections of family papers and rodeo photographs. In Ohio, the state board provided funding so that the Warren County Historical Society could place the photographic collection of The Western Star, Ohio’s longest running newspaper (1807-2012), in archival folders and boxes, and for Otterbein University to properly rehouse the papers of Walter G. Clippinger, the university’s president from 1909 to 1939.

Although purchasing archival supplies is one of the most common uses of regrant funds, many other types of projects are also funded. The Arizona Archives Alliance, for example, was awarded funding for a symposium focusing on the role of archivists in addressing issues of social justice in their collecting. Many other institutions have engaged the services of a consultant, hired staff to process collections, or participated in archival training.

In recent years, an increasing number of regrant projects have focused on the digitization of a wide variety of records, including government documents, oral history interviews, maps, and photographs. Unfortunately, many of the institutions that undertake digitization projects only make these digital images available onsite.  In addition, many repositories that use regrant funds to process collections do not make their finding aids available online.

In 2015, the first grants under the NHPRC’s new State Board Programming Grants program are being awarded. With these grants, the NHPRC is placing a greater emphasis on using regrant funds to ensure that smaller repositories have the capacity to place finding aids and digital images online so that a broader range of historical documentation is widely available. For many citizens, it is the records that document their local communities that are the most important to them.  The NHPRC is working to see that these records are easily accessible.

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